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Jet Game Engine: Fabulous Features

The engine is finally approaching some kind of maturity. Here is a tally of the features I've finished so far:
  • Renderer: Written from stratch in DirectX, heavy use of HLSL
    • HDR Rendering
    • Bloom Effect
    • Cubemapping (shader driven)
    • Bumpmapping (shader driven)
    • Scriptable particle system
    • Billboards/textured quads
  • Physics: Using ODE.  Supports simple sphere volumes, box volumes and planes
  • Persistence: Through XML using eXpat.  All engine objects are XML-configurable
  • Scripting: Using Lua.  All engine objects can be manipulated by script
  • Audio: Using FMOD, with 3D sound!
Of course, these features are only a small subset of the features provided by a modern engine, but my goal was to make a uniform, easy-to-use, API. I strive to make each of the features my engine has as solid and well-engineered as possible. I'm using the quality-over-quantity approach. After all, I'm just one person, not a team of 300.

Most of these features are in the demo.

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